It’s Okay to Keep the Camera Off! Get link to section It’s Okay to Keep the Camera Off!

Why this Creates Inclusive Virtual Meetings Get link to section Why this Creates Inclusive Virtual Meetings

As virtual meetings remain a regular part of most people’s workdays, creating an environment where folks feel empowered to keep their cameras off can have a strong impact for many reasons.

  1. Blind/Low vision people may not be able to see what their colleagues are seeing or know where to look.
  2. Anxiety conditions can be exacerbated by being on camera.
  3. It may be difficult for Deaf/Hard of Hearing individuals to read CART or ASL while on camera.
  4. It supports those who need to take medical care (ex. medication, supplemental oxygen.)
  5. It supports those with ADHD by reducing external stimuli and visual distractions.
  6. Autistic people may stim (tap fingers, rock back and forth) to help process information and they may not be comfortable doing so on camera.

We recently shared this post on our social channels and fostered a great conversation about accommodations and individual experiences. It’s important to remember that, while keeping the camera off might be useful for some folks, others may have a different perspective. An open dialogue helps us learn together and is what builds truly inclusive workplaces.  What would you add to our list?

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Blue Note-pad sheet with white header reading: It's Ok to Keep the Camera Off! And a sub-header reading: Why this creates inclusive virtual meetings. Below is a to-do style list of the reasons why: 1) Blind/Low vision people may not be able to see what their colleagues are seeing or know where to look. 2) Anxiety conditions can be exacerbated by being on camera. 3) It may be difficult for Deaf/Hard of Hearing individuals to read CART or ASL while on camera. 4) It supports those who need to take medical care (ex. medication, supplemental oxygen.) 5) It supports those with ADHD by reducing external stimuli and visual distractions. 6) Autistic people may stim (tap fingers, rock back and forth) to help process information and they may not be comfortable doing so on camera. In the bottom right corner is an illustration of a person using a motorized wheelchair.